Mike Munnelly 1967-2020

Mike Munnelly, 1967-2020

I have copied and pasted Mike’s obituary from the Kingston newspaper at the bottom of this tribute blog. Michael Charles Munnelly had almost zero public internet presence, so although I was not in touch with him very much in the last half of his too-short life, I decided that it’s better to simply get started with this online memorial than to keep postponing it by trying to fill in the gaps. For friends and family that stumble across this blog, I invite you to post comments or contact me via email or phone if you would like to contribute a story, a photo, a video, whatever you’ve got, I’d love to have it. If you leave a comment (please do) I will approve it, I am just protecting against spam. ~ Keenan Wellar

From the celebration of the life of Michael Munnelly, Kingston, Ontario, June 19, 2022
Dean, Keenan, and Sean. Mike, it wasn’t quite a re-enactment of Century Club in your living room,
but we represented as best we could. It was awesome meeting many of your Kingston friends.

I didn’t meet Mike until Grade 6 when I transferred to D. Roy Kennedy Public School from Regina Public School so I could join the “enrichment” program, which was a version of what they now call “gifted.” Other accurate labels for that class would include “misfits” and “troublemakers” as well as the phrase “selective in our use of intellectual capacity.”

Mike Munnelly – Keenan Wellar – Sean Malone at D. Roy Kennedy 1980

I am not suggesting there were not some very bright students in the class, and Mike was one of them. I didn’t pay much attention to the academic performance of my junior high peers, but I remember enough that it is not surprising that he went on to excel as an early adopter of computers and information technology.

Something we did have in common was dealing with bullies. I was one of the youngest and smallest kids, and Mike always carried a fair bit of extra weight. I think it explains in part why Mike demanded a very high degree of loyalty from his friends. Trust was easily broken – including through errors and misunderstandings – but he also had a soft side and it did not take much more than a little time before he’d offer an apology. In the high school years this often took the form of a peace offering like sharing some candy from his “magic purse” (sort of like the European carry-all of Seinfeld fame) which was usually fully stocked from the “candy counter” at the Carlingwood Sears.

Deserved or not, our rivals used to call this Dirty Rotten Kids school!

But back to DRK – that’s where I first met Mike and many others who next attended Nepean High School with me. This includes Sean Malone, Steve Willis, Mike Crawley, Rick Robinson, David Feldberg, Ian Ruddle, Ian Williamson, and Monica Hemingway. Sorry if I forgot anyone, please let me know. I think it was Mike (M), Sean, Ian R, Mike C, and Rick R and I that played a lot of the board game RISK, I think Rick’s dad also played and those were pretty intense games that could go all day and night. I think Mike C was one of the first owners of Atari. Or was it Intellivision? And Rick had Super Channel? Anyway, I am pretty sure we had a lot of fun and ate a lot of chips.

There’s Mike Crawley and Rick Robinson in Grade 9!

UPDATE! Mike C has filled me in – he had BOTH an Atari and an Intellivision. The Atari came second-hand from Mike M, it was supposed to be a Christmas surprise arranged by their moms, but Mike M told Mike C about it beforehand. Love these details!

Sean and Mike were the friendships that endured through high school and beyond. I don’t remember a whole lot about our times together at DRK, but I have some very specific memories, like the three of us sitting at a table together in Mr. Hayes (photo above) art class and launching supplies (scissors, rulers, anything at all, really) through an open window onto the school front lawn, and we’d pick them up during outdoor laps in gym class. I also remember pomegranates, and Mike always having money – because his parents would give him cash prizes for losing weight, which he accomplished off and on with interesting diets – including “the pomegranate diet.”

I think this was Mike’s exact Commodore 64 setup. He had two joysticks of course.

I don’t have a great sense of time on this, but in the summers in particular, I know I started spending a lot of time in the neighbourhood on the other side of the 417 where Sean, Ian, and Mike lived (and later, where we also spent time with many others who attended Nepean HS like Jeff Wigle, Tony Martino, and more). I don’t know which summer it was – I suspect it was 1981 or 1982 – but Mike was for a time my best friend, and I was at his house almost every day getting beaten on his Commodore 64. I can hardly remember his dad as he seemed to keep to himself a fair bit, but his mom had a very strong personality, and also kept us very well fed.

Google street maps didn’t have a good image so I drove by myself in January 2022, it doesn’t look like “Mike’s House” has changed very much.

Mike’s house was a popular hangout, probably because he had a lot of freedoms and a pretty sweet setup. He had video games, a billiards room, a pool (nothing fancy, but still) and it seemed like fairly often his parents were away and we had late night poker games and got into other sorts of trouble, like playing Century Club with his university friend Dean Huffman.

Mike-Sean-Dean 1990 Grads at CU (I went to uOttawa and finished my BA in 1991 – I ended up at Carleton many years later to complete an MA)

Something that might surprise people who met Mike later in life is that he was a pretty decent athlete. Starting at DRK and into NHS we played a lot of tackle football (with no equipment) and Mike was tough to bring down – that’s not very surprising I suppose, but he was also quick and light-footed as a tennis player. We had many interesting matches in the park behind Jeff Wigle’s house (we also played football there).

Where it all happened! Navaho Park, with the old tennis courts, and our makeshift football field.

My Grade 9 memories with Mike were mainly about playing cards, pretty much every lunch hour, in what was known as the “upper hall” (I guess we had lockers up there, and we carved out a spot at the top of the stairs in front of the history room). We played a game called “31” as well as “Cheat” that somehow became highly competitive with occasional sparks of violence.

In addition to a lot of hair, the big thing in 1982 was the Rubik’s Cube, according to the yearbook. That’s Monica, another alumnus from DRK in the cube feature at NHS.

Most of my clearest memories are from the later years we spent at our lockers in what was known as the “Industrial Arts Area” (for no better reason than it was the only classroom in that piece of hallway). See photo collage below bottom right – I think this was Grade 12-13, because by then we were acting like we owned the place. It was a good hangout – you could keep an eye out for who was coming and going and duck behind the half-wall when needed. We were also infamous for “locker renovations” I don’t know who all did the same, but for sure Mike, Sean, and myself completed the most extensive locker renovations. This included creating a “suite” by dismantling all or part of an adjacent locker as well as creating a secret attic area by removing bricks from the wall space above the top of the locker, and putting the top on a hinge or other removable device. This is where I kept a small portable stereo even after I was banned from bringing it onto school grounds.

Pictured: a yearbook feature on lockers, discussing various renovations completed as a result of allowing students to choose their own. In the middle is what the “lower gym” looks like in 2022. When we established the Lower Gym Soccer League (a lot more on that below) it was a dingy storage space with nothing but those old blue gym mats and a couple of long benches that we used as a net. Top right that is Vice-Principal Pat McAlpine, almost always correct that we were “up to something” but we were usually a few steps ahead. Dear Pat: yes, we did steal Mr. McCleod’s desk. We hid it in the old boiler room in case anyone is still looking! It didn’t hurt that our pal Fraser Mackenzie’s dad was also a chemistry teacher and we occasionally managed to access his keys. Lower right, there’s Sean with RUSH superfan Chris Charlebois (standing exactly where Mike spent most of his time) as John Petric takes a leap (that’s a big drop) and Martin Brown has a laugh.
In the event that any of his friends from NHS days or his surviving family members might find their way to this tribute page for Mike, I wanted to take a moment to remember Chris Taylor. He was friends with everyone. The year he died he was seated right in front of me in geography class and we talked all the time – it was probably the only class where he got into any trouble, because I was always engaging him in conversation or some other sort of disruptive behaviour that typically ending up causing my peers grief but also a lot of laughs (right Karen and MJ?). I didn’t have a lot of experience with grief and I wasn’t sure it was OK that I was so sad about Chris when I was just a casual friend. I sent his parents a note and they wrote me back. I don’t remember exactly what was in it but the way they responded left no doubt as to where Chris got his wonderful disposition.

Looking back at those years through the lens of our yearbooks, perhaps our biggest collective legacy was the LGSL, as it was noted in many Grade 13 grad writeups. I was surprised and delighted to see how many people chose to mention it in the limited space available. I know there are a few players that didn’t make the photo, so feel free to let me know if you want on the list! Mike loved LGSL and he’d get very (very!) worked up and competitive. It was always something to look forward to.

I was delighted to find this in the 1985 yearbook, given that the Lower Gym Soccer League (LGSL) was essentially an illegal organization (I believe it was John initially, but many of us developed the requisite skills to pick the lock to the lower gym). I am not sure how this photo happened. But there we are! That’s John Petric, Calvin Fong, Martin Brown, Ian Williamson, Tony Martino, Mark Loftus, George Valenzuela (a friend of mine from Regina PS ask him about when I found the glasses he tried to lose) Mark Daniels, Harris Pleet, Brian Tenenbaum, Mike and Sean looking cute together, and that’s me doing some sort of howling. Or shouting “McAlpine is coming!” George and I mostly played goaltender on opposing teams. It was a very dangerous job, but then again, being checked into a wall by Mike out on the floor was no picnic either. I guess he didn’t play soccer, but Steve Poplove who came to Nepean after Grade 11 was definitely a frequent member of our crew.
It’s a bit fuzzy but I had to blow up this photo of Mike, because unless I miss my guess, he’s sporting part of his “Miami Vice” wardrobe, a short-lived epic fashion phase where Mike rocked out in white jackets and pants over floral shirt patterns. Spectacular doesn’t capture it! But also (the main point of these photos) Mike had a life largely unbeknownst to me as a talented trumpet player. Perhaps his bandmates can provide me with some additional insights. Since Sean and I bombed (me on trumpet unable to produce any noise and Sean on trombone unable to follow any notes) we don’t know what went on in band, but obviously Mike enjoyed it or he wouldn’t have kept going. He took up keyboard and guitar as well, and continued with those after retiring the trumpet.
Here is a bonus item from 2022 thanks to Library Technician Jean Fortier at NHS. In a previous collage there was a photo of John jumping…well, you can’t do that anymore! They have bricked in the gap, where it now says Math / Science and is painted purple on the locker side. The lockers are still there, how about that? But this would no longer be a cool hangout, not only because the garbage can is in the way, but you can’t see who is coming up the stairs anymore, not to mention, the top of that half-wall was sort of like a lunch counter for us. Nothing was better than a Coke Classic, bag of chips, and listening to some righteous tunes while watching the coming and going. Mike perched there a lot, and was kind enough to inform me when trouble was approaching.

I know this is a lot of stories about high school, but that’s mainly because I don’t have many photos for the decades after that. I did spend time with Mike in the university years. We also hung out from time to time with lots of those I already mentioned from NHS who stayed in Ottawa, along with new friends, of which Dean became a close friend of Mike throughout his adult life, and also blended in nicely with his old friends. In case you were wondering, we did have female friends and for some of us, even girlfriends during those high school years, but we mostly compartmentalized those relationships – not that many (as in 0) really wanted to be in the LGSL, for example, or play Century Club while trying to sing along to Pour Some Sugar On Me.

Mike had almost no social media presence, so I got quite a chuckle finding this one post on Facebook (and I suspect Mike only created an account so he could ask this question!). I also found some photos of one of our favourite hangouts – Monkey Joe’s at the old Westgate shopping centre (the mall including MJs was torn down and is being rebuilt) where I feel like we went for the King Can and Wings weekly special for several years. I wonder if Joe’s really thought they invented nachos as the sign says?!? This is also where my dad’s Corolla wagon sprung a leak in the radiator hose and I think it was Mike who suggested we could pee into the radiator. As this was happening, the friendly kitchen staff had already offered to provide jugs of water – but in the meantime, a helpful older man had approached the car and before we could say anything, dipped his finger in some of the pee, and announced “Boys, there’s some coolant or something all over the place in here.” I think Geoff Millen joined in for wings, and of course, also hosted at his amazing cottage.

I don’t know much about Mike’s post-university career, but I know he worked at Sentry Security Systems for a very long time – perhaps the entire time until he moved to Cornwall in 2019 as director of IT at Medical Arts Pharmacy.

“The modular design is new to the embedded DVR market” said Michael Munnelly, Director of Information Technology at Sentry Security Systems Inc. “The ability to easily upgrade the number of cameras and replace individual components of the DVR open up huge opportunities for our dealers and resellers servicing upgrade needs of existing clients and approaching new business.”
For nightlife, we followed the pattern typical of university students in the 80s and 90s. Wednesday night was Oliver’s at Carleton (probably where we had our most epic adventures) The Nox at uOttawa (sadly I could only find a photo from after it was changed to “1848”) and of course the Hull bar strip (fittingly, the photo I found features police on the scene for a stabbing). On Tap and Stoney Monday’s were some of the solid Byward Market locations we frequented.
Bonus! I found this in a little photo book. My parents rarely left me alone in the house, but I believe around 1988, I finally had the opportunity to return the favour with my friends and have a bit of a house party. Not a lot of photos were taken, but I love this one with Jeff and Mike, and of course we had to take a photo of empty beer bottles!

After Mike graduated and moved to Kingston I only saw him for weddings and funerals (about four of them) and things like that, but Dean and Sean kept in touch and spent more time with him. I don’t have a lot of photos from recent decades, but fortunately I snapped a couple of pics at Sean’s 2009 bachelor party, and of course, Mike was looking great at the wedding itself!

Looking good for some best man duties!
That’s Mike’s good friend Dean with the folded arms for Sean’s daytime bachelor party warmup.
One of the reasons I spent less time with Mike in recent decades is I couldn’t really handle the chicken wings and alcohol lifestyle any more. But here we are in 2009, I believe at the Whiskey Bar in the Byward Market. This York Street location has had many names over the years, including Houlihan’s that we patronized in the late 80s, so I think we felt pretty comfortable in that environment despite being 20 years older than most people in the place that night. The feeling was not mutual however, as we all took to the dance floor, and the other patrons quickly vacated the area. A wise choice. We needed the room and it is a nice memory (what I can remember) of hanging out with Mike, what turned out to be my last time sharing drinks with him.
I got this bonus photo from Sean, they went to see a Buffalo Bills game in 2015 (best guess). Apparently Mike was pretty much miserable the whole time, but it’s nice that he managed a smile in the photo next to Dean. The solo photo reveals how he was really feeling. I don’t know if he remained this way as an older adult, but Mike was never one to hide how he was feeling. The best memories are from when he found something funny, because he would laugh so hard that he would cry! I can remember that happening more than a few times, and in fact, if I just visualize Mike in a laughing fit, I can make myself laugh just as hard. He also had some great one-liners. I think it must have been in Grade 13 when I was yet to turn 18 and I wanted to sell off some of my coin collection. I wasn’t old enough for the policy at the Sears Coin Counter (yep, that really existed) so I asked Mike to sign the papers for me. The skeptical sales clerk explained to Mike that he would be responsible if the coins were stolen, and he replied immediately “He’s done a lot of stupid things, and this might be another one of those bad decisions, but he’s my friend and he wouldn’t send me to jail, even for beer money.” The woman nodded “OK then” and I walked out with my cash. Thanks Mike!
Sean tells me that Mike had worked hard on getting fit recently and I was able to find a bit of a before/after that clearly shows this to be true! I got the photo from his Facebook account, which has exactly two photos, and one very amusing conversation where Mike says “Facebook is terrible, you guys know they sell all your information right? Say goodbye to any privacy at all!”
It is with deep sorrow that we announce the passing of Mike Munnelly, who passed away unexpectedly in his home on September 2nd, 2020 in Cornwall, Ontario at the age of 53. Mike was born in England on June 4th, 1967. He spent the majority of his life in Kingston, Ontario and had recently moved to Cornwall, Ontario. Mike will be deeply missed by many close friends that were like family. He is preceded in death by his father, Brendan Munnelly and his mother, Sylvia Munnelly (nee Vince). Mike had a passion for music and technology. He collected a variety of instruments and many technological appliances. Mike was always full of joy and found a sense of humour in everything. For those close to him, his sarcastic humour and wit will be unmatched. His laugh will not be forgotten. A celebration of life will take place at a later date.
Published on September 23, 2020

(More photos including Mike’s Grade 13 yearbook writeup below)

1985 class photo – that year both a yearbook and a calendar were produced, so even as Grade 12 we had a group photo, usually a tradition only for the graduating class. The 1983 and 1986 yearbooks received the silver medal in a contest judged by Ottawa Citizen writers.
Grade 13. That’s Sean hanging off the railing with a beer and I am holding up my own Carlsberg. I don’t know where Mike is in all of this. But putting together these memories has been really good for me. I realized that although much of high school were probably some of the worst days of my life, I also had a lot more fun and a lot more friends than the narrative I’ve been carrying around. And since I got my hands on a digitized yearbook thanks to the kindness of current NHS staff, I am going to randomly share some more images. You will see a bunch of coded and not so coded references to many of the topics above.
Mike isn’t visible in this photo, but “ski club” was memorable madness. You’d get on a school bus right after the final bell and they took us up to Mont Cascades, I honestly can’t remember what permissive teacher or teachers were involved in supporting this, but bless them for the opportunity. We always brought my portable stereo and played it from the back seat. I am not sure how this photo happened, but it seems like a last minute effort to get ski club into the 86 yearbook. That’s me falling down – the photo gives the appearance that Brian pushed me, but he was actually coming to help me get up. I see Fraser and John there in the middle, and that’s Sean’s head just behind Fraser. In addition to frequently successfully ordering alcohol in the ski lodge, we used to do violent downhill races where the rules allowed for “anything” and I believe Mike once used a large piece of wood in an effort to take out an opponent. I do believe Jeff or Sean lost a piece of tooth, not from the lumber, but in a collision when a ski tip bashed into his face. To our credit, I think we dropped this particular racing format after that night.
I had to dig deep for some cafeteria references. It’s hard to read but next to the hot dog is a poem about food fights. We took part in a legendary food fight, I think in 1984. It was just like in the movies – one person threw something, and then it just took off. I think Principal Grant came in after it had been going on for a few minutes (we are talking probably 400 students throwing food) and everyone stopped. He made a speech, and then one person lobbed an apple and it started up again. If there was video in those days we would have broken the internet. I am talking about tables overturned to make forts, and everything. This story sometimes gets mixed up with the reference in my own grad write-up when Sean pounded his fist onto a ketchup packet and shot it onto my shirt. That did not start a food fight – it started me chasing him all over the school with a ketchup packet, and when I finally caught up to him, I tried to get revenge but he got his hand over the packet and it just oozed out onto the floor. We ended up visiting the main office and without even having a chance to collaborate, explained that it was just having fun, and we were sorry for being noisy. Mike and I spent a lot of time in the cafeteria lineup together, I think the donuts were the main draw. Everything else was a bit weird. Now, don’t you kids out there go doing this, but it was a “thing” back then that what you managed to eat in line you didn’t have to pay for. That was not a school rule of course. As noted in the photo, New Coke was the big issue we had to deal with in 86. I was pretty upset about it, but then came Coke Classic and my world made sense again.
It‘s ridiculous that I haven’t talked about CARS yet. “Munnelly” and “Volvo” were as one. Comment from Sean: “Don’t forget the racing gloves!” Being younger and having somewhat less relaxed parents, I got driven more than I drove, but I did try to make up for lost time once I got some access to the Brown Bomber, a fugly car to be sure, but it definitely got the job done. Nothing really beats Sean’s Lincoln though, it looked like something out of a Stephen King movie. I slept in the back seat one night in his driveway. I don’t think that was something his parents had approved, but there was always an explanation. My last memory of the Lincoln and Mike was riding in the back after our graduation party in Hull, driving to a house party somewhere. Or to a boat cruise. Or both. Anyway, I was in the back with a very nice Grace 12 girl that was not my date (take it easy, I went without a date and she had gone with a friend) and poor Mike was jammed up next to us. He was very good about the whole thing, really. The last memory I have of Mike in the Volvo was driving way too fast down Navaho the day of the grad party. I was actually in Tony Martino’s car, this cherry red Sedan that you’d see in a Soprano’s episode. Tony was trying to keep up and I explained that Mike would probably do just about anything to prevent that, so the race was called off and we all arrived and got home from grad safely. Thanks for all the rides over the years Mike, I know it never quite balanced out – candy, money, or rides. Thanks again, for everything.
Rest in peace my friend.

8 Comments

  1. Long live the spirit of the LGSL. We miss you Big M!

    Like

  2. Mike Crawley says:

    I am so sorry to hear of Mike’s passing. I remember him well from D. Roy Kennedy and Nepean High School.
    Keenan – Your tribute is wonderful. It captured Mike so well in a few paragraphs and brought back a lot of memories.
    Mike

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Carol Thomas says:

    That was awesome Keenan!

    Like

    1. Thank you did you know Mike?

      Like

  4. Martin Brown says:

    Thank you Keenan for the trip down memory lane! I had not realized that Mike had passed, so sad! I had forgotten many of those Nepean moments…maybe due to one too many zombies at Peter’s Pantry (downstairs). I had completely forgotten about our unofficial soccer league. I just remembered that I am the one who was able to break into the schools basement using my lunchbox spoon! I remember Mike being the goalie and making a lot of saves. I have very fond memories of a trip Mike and I made to Acapulco in the early 90’s. We had lost touch a couple of years after and always wondered how he was doing. Once again thank you for taking the time to write such a wonderful life story!

    Martin

    Like

    1. I was hoping you might find your way here somehow Martin! Once NHS gave me copies of the old yearbooks, the memories came flooding back bigtime. I always thought it was John who first picked the locks to the LG but it was you! I think he copied your technique. George and I were usually goalies…Mike liked trying to check people into the cement wall haha. Thank you for checking in, that’s amazing that you guys went to Acapulco!

      Like

      1. Martin Brown says:

        Ah yes, you are correct! Now I remember trying to avoid being body checked by Mike. Now that I think about it, I remember Tony Martino not being too happy with Mike and took a running check into Mike back and sent him FLYING into the stack of chairs next to the stairs. Mike crawled out of there all dazed….

        Like

      2. Mike and Tony were amazing rivals. I can picture them running into each other playing tackle football. There was a mutual respect there. I think after the fact they both found themselves wondering why they keep hurting themselves trying to run over the other.

        Like

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

  1. Ah yes, you are correct! Now I remember trying to avoid being body checked by Mike. Now that I think…

  2. Thank you Keenan for the trip down memory lane! I had not realized that Mike had passed, so sad! I…

  1. Ah yes, you are correct! Now I remember trying to avoid being body checked by Mike. Now that I think…

  2. Thank you Keenan for the trip down memory lane! I had not realized that Mike had passed, so sad! I…

8 Comments

  1. Long live the spirit of the LGSL. We miss you Big M!

    Like

  2. Mike Crawley says:

    I am so sorry to hear of Mike’s passing. I remember him well from D. Roy Kennedy and Nepean High School.
    Keenan – Your tribute is wonderful. It captured Mike so well in a few paragraphs and brought back a lot of memories.
    Mike

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Carol Thomas says:

    That was awesome Keenan!

    Like

    1. Thank you did you know Mike?

      Like

  4. Martin Brown says:

    Thank you Keenan for the trip down memory lane! I had not realized that Mike had passed, so sad! I had forgotten many of those Nepean moments…maybe due to one too many zombies at Peter’s Pantry (downstairs). I had completely forgotten about our unofficial soccer league. I just remembered that I am the one who was able to break into the schools basement using my lunchbox spoon! I remember Mike being the goalie and making a lot of saves. I have very fond memories of a trip Mike and I made to Acapulco in the early 90’s. We had lost touch a couple of years after and always wondered how he was doing. Once again thank you for taking the time to write such a wonderful life story!

    Martin

    Like

    1. I was hoping you might find your way here somehow Martin! Once NHS gave me copies of the old yearbooks, the memories came flooding back bigtime. I always thought it was John who first picked the locks to the LG but it was you! I think he copied your technique. George and I were usually goalies…Mike liked trying to check people into the cement wall haha. Thank you for checking in, that’s amazing that you guys went to Acapulco!

      Like

      1. Martin Brown says:

        Ah yes, you are correct! Now I remember trying to avoid being body checked by Mike. Now that I think about it, I remember Tony Martino not being too happy with Mike and took a running check into Mike back and sent him FLYING into the stack of chairs next to the stairs. Mike crawled out of there all dazed….

        Like

      2. Mike and Tony were amazing rivals. I can picture them running into each other playing tackle football. There was a mutual respect there. I think after the fact they both found themselves wondering why they keep hurting themselves trying to run over the other.

        Like

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s